Posts tagged "1204017"

The Gillette Company v. Provost, et al. (Lawyers Weekly No 12-040-17)

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS SUFFOLK, ss. SUPERIOR COURT. 1584CV00149-BLS2 ____________________ THE GILLETTE COMPANY v. CRAIG PROVOST, JOHN GRIFFIN, WILLIAM TUCKER, DOUGLAS KOHRING, and SHAVELOGIC, INC. ____________________ MEMORANDUM AND ORDER ON CROSS-MOTIONS FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT The Gillette Company alleges that four former employees helped ShaveLogic, Inc., develop a new disposable cartridge shaving razor using Gillette’s confidential information. Gillette claims that in so doing Defendants violated G.L. c. 93A, the individual defendants breached non-disclosure agreements with Gillette, and all five Defendants engaged in a civil conspiracy. It also claims that ShaveLogic’s patents and patent applications should be subjected to a constructive trust in favor of Gillette. Gillette does not claim that any of the individual defendants breached a covenant not to compete with Gillette. The parties previously stipulated to the dismissal with prejudice of Gillette’s trade secret claims.1 ShaveLogic claims, in turn, that Gillette intentionally interfered with prospective business relations and violated c. 93A, by threatening to bring and then filing baseless legal claims in an attempt to keep ShaveLogic from entering the market for so-called wet-shaving products. The parties have filed cross-motions for summary judgment on all remaining claims and counterclaims. The Court concludes that Defendants are entitled to summary judgment in their favor on Gillette’s remaining claims because Gillette cannot prove that Defendants misused any of Gillette’s confidential information or that the individual defendants breached any non-disclosure agreement. The Court 1 The Court (Salinger, J.) previously ordered the dismissal with prejudice of Gillette’s claims against three other defendants. It dismissed Gillette’s claims that ShaveLogic’s general counsel breached fiduciary duties that he owed as a former Gillette patent counsel and that ShaveLogic’s CEO, its president, and the other individual defendants aided and abetted that alleged breach of fiduciary duty and conspired to bring it about. – 2 – also concludes that Gillette is not entitled to summary judgment on ShaveLogic’s counterclaims because a reasonable fact finder could conclude that Gillette had deliberately brought baseless claims in an attempt to bully ShaveLogic out of the market. The Court will schedule a final pre-trial conference to discuss trial of ShaveLogic’s counterclaims. 1. Gillette’s Claims. Defendants are entitled to summary judgment in their favor on Gillette’s remaining claims because the undisputed material facts show that Gillette has “no reasonable expectation of proving” at least one element of each of its claims. See Boazava v. Safety Ins. Co., 462 Mass. 346, 350 (2012). “A nonmoving party’s failure to establish an essential element of her claim ‘renders all other facts immaterial’ and mandates summary judgment in favor of the moving party.” Roman v. Trustees of Tufts College, 461 Mass. 707, 711 (2012), quoting Kourouvacilis v. General Motors Corp., 410 Mass. 706, 711 (1991). 1.1. Unfair Competition—G.L. c. […]

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - April 27, 2017 at 12:57 pm

Categories: News   Tags: , , , , ,

The Gillette Company v. Provost, et al. (Lawyers Weekly No. 12-040-17)

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS SUFFOLK, ss. SUPERIOR COURT. 1584CV00149-BLS2 ____________________ THE GILLETTE COMPANY v. CRAIG PROVOST, JOHN GRIFFIN, WILLIAM TUCKER, DOUGLAS KOHRING, and SHAVELOGIC, INC. ____________________ MEMORANDUM AND ORDER ON CROSS-MOTIONS FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT The Gillette Company alleges that four former employees helped ShaveLogic, Inc., develop a new disposable cartridge shaving razor using Gillette’s confidential information. Gillette claims that in so doing Defendants violated G.L. c. 93A, the individual defendants breached non-disclosure agreements with Gillette, and all five Defendants engaged in a civil conspiracy. It also claims that ShaveLogic’s patents and patent applications should be subjected to a constructive trust in favor of Gillette. Gillette does not claim that any of the individual defendants breached a covenant not to compete with Gillette. The parties previously stipulated to the dismissal with prejudice of Gillette’s trade secret claims.1 ShaveLogic claims, in turn, that Gillette intentionally interfered with prospective business relations and violated c. 93A, by threatening to bring and then filing baseless legal claims in an attempt to keep ShaveLogic from entering the market for so-called wet-shaving products. The parties have filed cross-motions for summary judgment on all remaining claims and counterclaims. The Court concludes that Defendants are entitled to summary judgment in their favor on Gillette’s remaining claims because Gillette cannot prove that Defendants misused any of Gillette’s confidential information or that the individual defendants breached any non-disclosure agreement. The Court 1 The Court (Salinger, J.) previously ordered the dismissal with prejudice of Gillette’s claims against three other defendants. It dismissed Gillette’s claims that ShaveLogic’s general counsel breached fiduciary duties that he owed as a former Gillette patent counsel and that ShaveLogic’s CEO, its president, and the other individual defendants aided and abetted that alleged breach of fiduciary duty and conspired to bring it about. – 2 – also concludes that Gillette is not entitled to summary judgment on ShaveLogic’s counterclaims because a reasonable fact finder could conclude that Gillette had deliberately brought baseless claims in an attempt to bully ShaveLogic out of the market. The Court will schedule a final pre-trial conference to discuss trial of ShaveLogic’s counterclaims. 1. Gillette’s Claims. Defendants are entitled to summary judgment in their favor on Gillette’s remaining claims because the undisputed material facts show that Gillette has “no reasonable expectation of proving” at least one element of each of its claims. See Boazava v. Safety Ins. Co., 462 Mass. 346, 350 (2012). “A nonmoving party’s failure to establish an essential element of her claim ‘renders all other facts immaterial’ and mandates summary judgment in favor of the moving party.” Roman v. Trustees of Tufts College, 461 Mass. 707, 711 (2012), quoting Kourouvacilis v. General Motors Corp., 410 Mass. 706, 711 (1991). 1.1. Unfair Competition—G.L. c. […]

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - April 27, 2017 at 5:48 am

Categories: News   Tags: , , , , ,