Posts tagged "Tips"

Share Your Boston Biking Tips With NYT Map

Do you have advice for fellow cyclists about where you pedal in and around Boston? South End Patch News

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - July 29, 2013 at 2:50 am

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Tips to Keep Your Pet Safe From the Heat This Summer

From the ASPCA: For many people, nothing beats lounging in the backyard on the Fourth of July with good friends and family — including the four-legged members of the household. While it may see South End Patch News

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - July 6, 2013 at 11:43 am

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10 Tips for Adjusting to Heated Yoga Classes in Summer

I’ve been practicing heated yoga for 13 years. I’ve mixed in other styles as well, including those that don’t involve heat, and I can say I enjoy both and find both effective. However, I will admit that once it starts to get hot outside, I need to make adjustments in my practice so I can practice comfortably in a heated class. In the past few weeks, the weather here in Boston has started to shift to warmer temperatures. With that, as expected, I’ve had an increase in questions from students about how to practice safely in a heated studio. They’ve also had some questions about experiences in their body that they don’t normally feel when it’s cold out. If you’re practicing heated yoga in the warmer summer months, here are 10 tips to help you adjust safely: 1. The water you drink before class is just as important as drinking water after class. Many of us don’t think about additional hydration in the summer months and keep our same routine of liquid intake and then hop into the hot studio. In the warmer months, with increased sweating even before you arrive, you need to replace that hydration before you start class. 2. Replace your water with fluids that have electrolytes. When you sweat, you lose electrolytes such as sodium and potassium. These need to be replaced so you’re not dehydrated and to keep your overall systems in balance. I like coconut water but there are many other supplemented waters out there you can try. Be aware if drinking sports drinks of the added sugar content. Coconut water is great because there is no added sugar. 3. Check your diet. As it gets warmer out, we need to adjust our intake so we aren’t overeating or ingesting heavy foods, especially if we plan to take a heated class within a few hours of eating. When you eat, the blood goes to your digestive organs and away from the muscles, so overeating will work against you in class. However, we also need to make reasonable food choices before yoga. If the class is before the lunch or dinner hour, make sure you select foods that are easy to digest and watch portion sizes. A banana, other fruit, nut bar or Greek yogurt are good choices. 4. Rest more. Some students never rest until the very end of class when the teacher calls for everyone to rest in shavasana. During the summer months, you may find yourself feeling drained before you even step in the door, due to the increased heat and humidity outside. As you’re practicing, take time to stop in Child’s Pose and take a few breaths before joining […]

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - June 9, 2013 at 9:31 am

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Tips for Finding the Right Personal Trainer

Do you lack the motivation to exercise on your own? Would you like to design your own exercise program? Do you have specific exercise goals? If so, hiring a personal trainer may be just what you need. A personal trainer will design the right workout plan to help you set and meet your goals. In addition, a personal trainer will teach you proper techniques, keeping you safe from injury and helping you get the most out of your workout. AOL Health offers some tips on selecting a personal trainer:  Finding a trainer: Contact your local gym or fitness center, which often offer personal training packages for an additional fee. Look for trainers online, in your local newspaper or Yellow Pages. Some trainers may be willing to travel to your home. (But you should be sure to conduct a background check on these professionals.) Try out a trainer. Ask for a list of trainers at your gym, and then observe them to see if you like how they interact with their clients. Get a referral from a friend or other gym members. You can often buy one session and see if the trainer is a good fit for you.  Check credentials. Look for a reputable certification and a degree in the exercise/fitness field. Ask for references from other clients and discuss the trainer’s past experience. Here are some organizations and websites that certify trainers: American Council on Exercise (ACE): www.acefitness.org National Strength & Conditioning Association: www.nsca-lift.org IDEA Health and Fitness Association: www.ideafit.com Other certifications include the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the Aerobics & Fitness Association of America (AFAA). Package details.  Don’t shy away from hiring a trainer because you think doing so is just for the rich and famous. Gyms often offer package deals and payment options. One inexpensive option is group training—exercise with friends to save money. Pitfalls to avoid. Beware a trainer who tries to sell supplements. The average person can get all the nutrients needed from a healthy diet and does not need protein powders and herbs. Be careful about getting nutritional advice from a trainer. Only a registered dietitian is qualified to give diet advice. Do your homework before hiring someone to make sure you get the expertise you need. Soon you’ll be on your way to meeting your fitness goals!   Patch invites readers to share their own experiences with personal trainers. Personal trainers are also encouraged to blog on Patch with additional tips. South End Patch

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - April 29, 2013 at 2:28 pm

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Boston Schools Superintendent Shares Tips for Talking with Kids about Marathon Bombing

In the aftermath of Monday’s Boston Marathon bombing, Boston Public Schools Superintendent Carol R. Johnson sent a letter to staff and families of students titled, “Talking with Children about Tragedies,” that was shared via the Warren-Prescott School newsletter on Tuesday morning. In the newsletter, Warren-Prescott Principal Michele Davis wrote: “Our sincere thoughts and prayers go out to all of those affected by yesterday’s events. Our own Melissa Shea ran the Boston Marathon yesterday and her family was among the spectators. I am relieved to report that Melissa and her family are safe.” Davis asked that anyone with information about other Warren-Prescott families that may have been affected by the bombing to contact her at mdavis@boston.k12.ma.us. Boston Public Schools are closed this week for April Vacation. Below is Johnson’s letter: —– Dear BPS families and friends, We hope you and your family are safe tonight. We wish to express our deep gratitude to the first responders, public safety personnel and everyday citizens who stepped in to help today at the Boston Marathon. Many of you have questions about how to talk to your children about today’s events. Below, please find resources from the National Association of School Psychologists, which has prepared tip sheets for parents and teachers to help children, teenagers and adults cope with tragic situations. Among their professional advice (from the NASP website): Remain calm and reassuring. Children will take their cues from you, especially young children. Acknowledge that the threats and uncertainty are unnerving but the likelihood is that you and your children or students will be okay. There is a difference between the possibility of danger and the probability of it affecting them personally. Acknowledge and normalize their feelings. Allow children to discuss their feelings and concerns and encourage any questions they may have regarding this event. Listen and empathize. An empathetic listener is very important. Let them know that others are feeling the same way and that their reactions are normal and expected. Take care of your own needs. Take time for yourself and try to deal with your own reactions to the situation as fully as possible. You will be better able to help your children if you are coping well. If you are anxious or upset, your children are more likely to be so as well. Talk to other adults such as family, friends, faith leaders, or a counselor. It is important not to dwell on your fears by yourself. Sharing feelings with others often makes us feel more connected and secure. Take care of your physical health. Make time, however small, to do things you enjoy. Turn off or monitor the television. It is important to stay […]

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - April 17, 2013 at 5:17 am

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12 Tips for Healthier Grocery Shopping

Back in November of last year, my neighborhood of Charlestown lost its grocery store. As a result, instead of walking up the street and shopping in familiar surroundings, I’ve been relegated to shopping in a variety of locations, including some of the big superstore grocery chains. This has been an experience for me. Shopping in these big grocery stores is a chance to experience everything that frustrates me about the food industry; it’s loud, (can be) unhealthy, obnoxious and manipulative. Just look at the physical space when you walk in: it’s assaulting. Bright, loud and colorful, it’s meant to seduce you into buying things you don’t need. The busiest and often unhealthiest options are conveniently placed on the ends of the aisles or in the checkout area where you’ll be enticed to grab them. Healthy things are harder to find than unhealthy; inexpensive options are often at the bottom of the shelf, not at eye level. Now, having said that, there are redeeming qualities of these large chains. They have a huge produce section. Their stock is delivered regularly. They are open early and stay open late. They can offer discounts at checkout. As soon as you start to open your eyes to what’s happening in the grocery store, you can be better armed to shop smart. Please know that this is not just about big grocery store chains; the natural food chains, while much more mindful, have their own set of challenges (that’s a different article). But the idea here is to recognize that these big store chains do not have your health in mind; they only have their revenue in mind. The more you spend on things you don’t need, the better for them. So, you’re going to turn the tables on that paradigm and shop smarter and win. Here’s how: Avoid shopping when you’re rushed and on weekends. Stress leads to impulsive, unhealthy purchases. When you shop rushed or when the store is typically packed, you’ll be tempted to buy things you don’t need and things that are unhealthy. I’d rather spend a little more on a healthy take-out dinner and shop the next day over shopping last minute. Avoid shopping when you’re hungry. When you’re hungry, you’re more likely to buy things that will satisfy cravings versus sustain you. Wait until your tank is full before hitting the aisles. Shop the outside more than the inside. This is an old trick but worth repeating. The “live” stuff is in the produce section; the “fake” stuff is in the aisles. If you’ve got concerns about spending money on produce you can’t eat quickly enough, stick to frozen vegetables and use the produce […]

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - April 7, 2013 at 12:54 pm

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Tips to Keep Your Dog Safe During the Storm

South End Patch

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - February 7, 2013 at 9:32 pm

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NSTAR Offers Tips to on How to Prepare for Snowstorm

With a major nor’easter expected to impact the Boston area beginning Friday, NSTAR announced on Thursday it will will activate its emergency response plan for a significant impact on the electric grid. “We’re well into our preparations for responding to potentially widespread power outages resulting fromthe nor’easter’s high winds and heavy snow,” said Craig Hallstrom, President of NSTAR Electric. “Weprepare year-round for storms like this and stand ready to address damage to our system as soon as itbecomes safe to do so.” NSTAR said 3,000 employees are currently preparing to assist in the storm reponse effort, and the company has also secured additional contractor line and tree crews.  The company is advising customers to make advanced preparations as well. You can can prepare for storm damage and power outages by assembling a storm kit in advance Some suggestions for items to include in a storm kit are: Flashlights with spare batteries A battery-operated radio or TV First-aid kit and medications Canned, freeze-dried or dehydrated foods A manual can opener Bottled water Baby or pet supplies Important phone numbers To report power outages, use NSTAR’s online “Report an Outage” tool or call NSTAR at 800-592-2000 to report your outage. Tips if the power goes out: Stay clear of all fallen tree limbs and electrical wires as well as anything they are touching – such as puddles and metal fences. Assume all downed wires are “live” and stay away. Call NSTAR and local emergency personnel. Persons dependent on electrically powered life support systems should have a pre-arranged plan concerning power outage situations. Prepare a list of emergency phone numbers and have it readily available. Disconnect appliances that will go on automatically when the power is restored. These include refrigerators, stoves, furnaces and water heaters. Turn off appliances such as washers, dryers, computers and TV’s. Once power is restored, turn appliances back on one at a time to avoid a power surge. If using candles or matches, be extremely careful and never leave open flames unattended. Food in your refrigerator will keep for 6 to 9 hours, and food in your freezer will keep between 36 and 48 hours. It will help to minimize the number of times the door is opened.  In the winter, dress in layers and wear a hat. What is essential to your snowstorm kit? Tell us in the comments.  SOUTH END PATCH: Facebook | Twitter | E-mail Updates South End Patch

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - February 7, 2013 at 7:53 pm

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Ten Tips for Healthy Eating

Around this time of year, people start re-evaluating their New Year’s Resolutions. They either are still on track and feeling great or they’ve lost their resolve and are feeling frustrated and defeated. One of the common goals set at the beginning of the year is around weight loss.  As a yoga teacher, I get questions about yoga’s effectiveness for weight loss. People want to know how many calories they’ll burn, is hot yoga more effective for weight loss than unheated yoga or how many times per week do you need to do yoga to lose weight. I usually say something like this: “Yoga, done regularly can be an effective tool for managing your weight. If you can get to a studio class three times per week and supplement that with 20 to 30 minutes at home on the other days or use these alternate days for pure cardiovascular exercise (plus one rest day), this can be a solid path to controlling or losing weight (you need to be eating healthy too).” Today’s focus will be on things you can do to bring more awareness and health to what you eat. Eating better, while it’s a great start, is only one piece of the puzzle. But it’s a huge piece and something that, if ignored, weight loss can’t happen (even if you’re running miles a day). Take a look at these tips: Build your daily meals on the “One hand” approach (five times). Eat three main meals a day and supplement with two snacks. This is a simple way to remember your eating “events” and decrease your caloric intake.Once you’ve committed to this “One hand” approach, start to look at what it is you’re eating during these 5 meals, where and how. It’s not enough to limit your meals; it’s also important to eat healthy foods that will sustain you and eat them with mindfulness so you enjoy them and can register a feeling of fullness.  Your 5 eating events should include 3 main meals. We’ll call these breakfast, lunch and dinner but that doesn’t mean you need to eat them at those times. These 3 main meals will keep your blood sugar at a reasonable level, provide you with nutrition and energy to get through the day and keep cravings down. These main meals should include a mix of lean protein (chicken, fish, beans, lentils) carbohydrates (fruit, veggies and whole grains) and fat (less fat and healthy fats, like olive oil, nuts, fish and avocado). Limit your bread intake, eliminate it or replace thick bread with healthy alternatives. Chunky bagels, crusty bread with meals and rolls with your soup all add enjoyment and heartiness […]

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Posted by Massachusetts Legal Resources - February 3, 2013 at 10:18 am

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